Javascript is currently not supported, or is disabled by this browser. Please enable Javascript for full functionality.

Skip to main content
Home

Hagerstown Community College / HCC

Academic Catalog

2017-2018 Catalog 
    
    Oct 31, 2020  
2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Electronics

  
  •  

    ELE 205 - Repair and Maintenance for Instrumentation

    Prerequisite: ELE 113 .
    (2 Credits)
    Students will learn how to troubleshoot and repair typical instrumentation components using logical thinking, diagrams, and sequential techniques. Students will learn to recognize typical alarm conditions and take the appropriate corrective action. Students will recognize self-diagnostic errors and resolve the issue which caused the error. Use of measurement and testing equipment will be emphasized along with safe trade practices. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 206 - Electronic Communications Systems

    Prerequisite: ELE 103 
    (3 Credits)
    This course teaches students electronic communication circuits and systems, as it applies to typical industry systems. Students will study electro-magnetic frequency spectrum, resonant waveforms, LC circuits, band-pass filters, power and tuned voltage amplifiers, and oscillators. Topics covered also include bandwidth allocations, AM, FM, SSB modulations, antennas, SCADA and satellite systems. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 207 - Advanced Electronics/Electricity

    Prerequisite: ELE 103  and ELE 105 
    (3 Credits)
    This course builds on previously covered material, including circuits (AC/DC), electronics, PLCs, digital circuits, and microprocessors. Students will analyze and troubleshoot circuits and systems, as well as, design and build circuits typically found in industry. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 208 - Advanced Digital Circuit Design and Analysis

    Prerequisite: ELE 103 
    (4 Credits)
    This course teaches students digital electronics - on a component level and how digital circuits work. Students will study number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, flip-flops, counters, encoders, multiplexers, digital-to-analog (DAC) converters, and analog-to-digital converters (ADC). Upon completion of this course, students will be able to design, build, and troubleshoot various circuits commonly used in industry. Total of 60 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 210 - Energy System Management

    Prerequisite: ELE 110 .
    (3 Credits)
    This class will introduce students to the concept and application of energy management for residential, commercial housing, commercial offices, and industrial applications. Students will be introduced to techniques to automatically measure, collect the data in systems, and apply the data for energy (and money) saving techniques. Students will work with key regional industry partners to gain a hands-on understanding of these systems. Total of 45 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    ELE 213 - Instrumentation and Process Control II

    Prerequisite: ELE 113 .
    (3 Credits)
    Students will study instrumentation applications, techniques, adjustment, and calibration of various systems.  SCADA, PC and PLC based system control of basic processes are covered in detail.  Topics such as computerized data acquisition and evaluation are incorporated into the lab environment.  Students will use hands-on training systems to build and control processes. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 215 - SPC and Device Data Management

    Prerequisite: ELE 113 .
    (3 Credits)
    This class will introduce students to the concept and application of SPC (Statistical Process Control) and Device Data Management. This course will teach students how to apply the data being collected from factory, HVAC, and other data collection systems today, and present that data in reports for quality improvement and other management needs. In addition to the presentation of the data, we will focus on techniques for application of the data so that the business can focus on continuous improvement in their facilities, such as SPC. In factories and other businesses that require automated control systems, the jobs that focus on implementation are not as common as those that focus on application improvement. This course will give students a chance to gain key skills that are highly desired by controls businesses. Total of 45 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    ELE 235 - Advanced Concepts and Applications of Instrumentation and Controls

    Prerequisite: ELE 213 .
    (3 Credits)
    Students will learn the concepts and applications behind combining electrical devices, electronic devices, instrumentation devices, and mechanical devices in the ever growing area of automation. Topics include advanced PLC and PC-based SCADA system monitor and control of complex processes. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ELE 269 - Internship


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.



Emergency Medical Services

  
  •  

    EMS 120 - Emergency Medical Technician - Part A

    Prerequisite: Completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.
    (8 Credits)
    This is the first of three required courses that, upon completion, will qualify students for Maryland or National Registry testing for Emergency Medical Technician certification. This course,  , and     must be completed consecutively in order to qualify for testing. This course introduces students to Foundations of EMT, Patient Assessment, Airway Management, and Medical Part I and II. Course fee required. Total of 87 hours of lecture and 29 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EMS 121 - Emergency Medical Technician - Part B

    Prerequisite:  .
    Corequisite:  
    (3 Credits)
    The second of three required courses that, upon completion, will qualify students for Maryland or National Registry testing for EMT certification. This course,   and   must be completed consecutively in order to qualify for testing.  This course introduces students to Trauma Part I and Practical Labs. Course fee required. Total of 24 hours of lecture, 21 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EMS 122 - Emergency Medical Technician Practicum


    Corequisite: EMS 120 .
    (1 Credit)
    This course provides supervised clinical experience in the field setting for skills students are learning in EMS 120  and EMS 121 . Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of clinical and in-class seminar.

  
  •  

    EMS 140 - Introduction to Advanced Life Support Principles

    Prerequisite: current EMT certification or equivalent.
    (3 Credits)
    This course prepares the student for entry into EMT-Intermediate or Paramedic training by introducing pathophysiology, cardiology, and neurology concepts. Practical training includes an introduction to electrocardiography, ALS diagnostic equipment, and assessment approaches. Additionally, students are introduced to the medical model of diagnosis and its relationship to paramedic assessment in the prehospital setting. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 151 - Introduction to Emergency Medical Services

    Prerequisite: Current EMT certification, completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.
    (3 Credits)
    This course introduces students to emergency medical services design, roles and responsibilities, paramedic wellness, critical thinking in the prehospital environment, paramedic assessment and diagnosis, history taking, and physical examination. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 155 - Anatomy and Physiology for EMS Providers

    Prerequisite: Current EMT certification, or CRT-I or EMT-I certification, completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.
    (4 Credits)
    This course is an integrated course of the structure and function of the human body systems and processes. Included in this course are cell biology, biochemistry, histology, and the body systems, as well as fluid and electrolyte balance, metabolism, and homeostasis. Course fee required. Total of 60 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 161 - Airway Management

    Prerequisite: Current EMT certification, completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.
    Corequisite: EMS 151  
    (3 Credits)
    This course considers appropriate assessment and airway management for medical and trauma patients. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 163 - Medical Emergencies I

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 , EMS 155 EMS 161 , EMS 181 , and EMS 201 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course emphasizes the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of patients with specific medical emergencies - respiratory, endocrine, toxicology, allergies, anaphylaxis, and infection. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 164 - Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 , EMS 155 EMS 161 EMS 181 , and EMS 201 .
    (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to cardiac electrophysiology, electrocardiography interpretation, and the assessment and management of patients with cardiovascular emergencies.  Course fee required. Total of 60 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 165 - Pharmacology and Cardiology Bridge

    Prerequisite: Completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.  Student must also possess a current national Registry Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate or be in the process of National Registry Testing form EMT-Intermediate.
    (4 Credits)
    This bridge course presents the ECG interpretation, assessment, and management of patients with cardiovascular emergencies and the pharmacological administration needed for the EMT-I to transition to EMT-P. ACLS certification included. Course fee required. Total of 60 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 166 - Medical Emergencies Bridge

    Prerequisite: EMS 155 , EMS 165 , EMS 180 , and  
    (3 Credits)
    This bridge course presents the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of medical patients with emphasis on respiratory, endocrine, toxicology, anaphylaxis, neurological, obstetrics, and behavioral emergencies needed for the EMT-I to transition to EMT-P. AMLS certification included. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 180 - EMT Intermediate to Paramedic Transition

    Prerequisite: Completion of   and   or appropriate score on placement test.  Student must also possess a current national Registry Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate or be in the process of National Registry Testing form EMT-Intermediate.
    (3 Credits)
    The EMT-Intermediate to Paramedic Bridge Program is designed for an individual who is licensed as an EMT-I or its equivalent and is seeking to obtain the National Registry Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic (EMT-P). Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of hybrid instruction.

  
  •  

    EMS 181 - EMS Practicum I


    (1 Credit)
    This course provides supervised clinical experience in area facilities for the skills learned in   , and  . Course fee required. Total of 60 hours of clinical and in class seminars.

  
  •  

    EMS 182 - EMS Practicum II

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 EMS 155 EMS 161 EMS 181 , and EMS 201 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course provides supervised clinical experience in various settings for the skills learned during the first program year. Course fee required. Total of 160 hours of clinical and in class seminars.

  
  •  

    EMS 185 - Paramedic Practicum

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 .
    (1 Credit)
    This course is for students currently accepted in the Paramedic program who want an additional opportunity to practice their paramedic skills. Course fee required. Total of 60 hours of clinical.

  
  •  

    EMS 201 - Shock Trauma Resuscitation


    (2 Credits)
    This course considers the pathophysiology and treatment of shock, and recognition and management of specific traumatic emergencies. Course fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 205 - Pediatrics and Trauma Bridge

    Prerequisite: EMS 155 , EMS 165  , EMS 180 , and   .
    (3 Credits)
    This bridge course presents the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of the pediatric patient with various medical conditions and the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of the trauma patient needed for the EMT-I to transition to EMT-P. PEPP and PHTLS certification included. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 210 - Medical Emergencies II

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 EMS 155 EMS 161 EMS 181 , and  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course reviews the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of medical patients with neurological, environmental, genitourinary, obstetric and gynecologic emergencies, and behavioral emergencies. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 211 - Pediatrics and Special Populations

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 EMS 155 EMS 161 EMS 181 , and EMS 201 .
    (2 Credits)
    This course presents specific training in pediatrics, including life-span development, pediatric assessment and management, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support. Additionally, issues of and approaches to patients in special populations, including pediatrics, geriatrics, bariatrics, and others with special needs are covered.  Course fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 220 - EMS Operations

    Prerequisite: EMS 163 EMS 164 EMS 182 EMS 210 , and EMS 211 
    (2 Credits)
    This course considers various topics associated with EMS operations. Valid driver’s license required. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 221 - Seminar in Paramedic Emergency Services

    Prerequisite: EMS 163 , EMS 164 , EMS 182 EMS 210  and EMS 211 .
    (2 Credits)
    This course serves as a review and preparation for the National Registry cognitive and skills examination following program completion. It serves to summarize and culminate all cognitive, psychomotor, and effective domain training. Course fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EMS 281 - EMS Practicum III

    Prerequisite: EMS 163 EMS 164 EMS 182  ,EMS 210 EMS 211   and current ACLS and PALS certification cards.
    (3 Credits)
    This course provides opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills of EMS 163  and EMS 164  in supervised clinical settings. Course fee required. Total of 150 hours of clinical and in class seminars.

  
  •  

    EMS 282 - EMS Practicum IV

    Prerequisite: EMS 163 EMS 164 EMS 182 EMS 210 EMS 211  and current ACLS and PALS certification cards.
    (3 Credits)
    This course offers opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the Paramedic program in supervised clinical settings. Course fee required. Total of 135 hours of clinical and in class seminars.

  
  •  

    EMS 283 - Bridge Practicum I

    Prerequisite:   and   or appropriate score on placement test.  Student must also possess a current national Registry Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate or be in the process of National Registry Testing form EMT-Intermediate.
    (3 Credits)
    This course provides supervised clinical experience in various settings for the skills learned during the EMT-I to EMT-P Bridge course. Course fee required. Total of 135 hours of clinical and in class seminars.

  
  •  

    EMS 284 - Bridge Practicum II

    Prerequisite: EMS 155 , EMS 165 , EMS 180 , and EMS 283 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course provides supervised clinical experience in various settings for the skills learned during the EMT-I to EMT-P Bridge course. Course fee required. Total of 135 hours of clinical and in class seminars.


Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    EGT 101 - Foundations of Engineering Technology

    Prerequisite: MAT 100 .
    (2 Credits)
    This course enables students to learn the techniques of decision making and problem solving using Microsoft Excel and MatLab as tools. Total of 30 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGT 136 - Mechanics

    Prerequisite:   or  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course uses the principles of statics to solve engineering problems that involve forces. Topics include finding reactions, equilibrium, friction, trusses, frames, centroids, and moment of inertia. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGT 150 - Introduction to CNC Programming

    Prerequisite: MAT 099 .
    (3 Credits)
    Computer numerical control is used to program a HAAS machining center to drill, contour, and pocket. An introduction to the CNC lathe is included. Laboratory fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EGT 231 - Strength of Materials

    Prerequisite: EGT 136 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course is a technical study of the stress and strain in materials from the action of external forces. The application of these principles is used in the design of structures and machines. Axial loads, torsion, and bending are analyzed individually and in combination. The deflection of beams and stability of columns are studied. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGT 234 - Machine Design

    Prerequisite: EGT 231 .
    (4 Credits)
    This course involves the study of various machine parts that carry loads and transmit power. Strength of material theory is expanded to include stress concentration, fatigue, and failure. Rivets, welds, springs, power transmission threads, chain and belt drives, gears, and bearings are included in an analytical approach to the design process. Total of 60 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGT 235 - Fluid Power

    Prerequisite: PHY 201 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course focuses on the industrial use of fluid power. The fundamental properties of fluid statics and dynamics are applied to the design of pumps, valves, motors, actuators, accumulators, fluid circuits, and control systems. Laboratory fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EGT 250 - Advanced CNC

    Prerequisite:   or consent of TCS Division.
    (3 Credits)
    This laboratory course introduces students to Computer-Aided Manufacturing. Using ESPRIT software, students will create numerical machine code to drive CNC milling machines or lathes. Laboratory fee required. Total of 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EGT 269 - Internship I


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.

  
  •  

    EGT 270 - Internship II


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.


Engineering

  
  •  

    EGR 103 - Introduction to Engineering Science

    Prerequisite: MAT 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the product development process, which includes: product research, product design, product analysis and evaluation, and product presentation. Additionally, each individual student should develop basic engineering and science principles as well as computer skills including; applications software, graphics software and programming software. Students enrolled in EGR 103 will be expected to have a basic knowledge of trigonometric functions. Laboratory fee required. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    EGR 108 - Statics


    Corequisite: MAT 203 .
    (3 Credits)
    A vector-based treatment of statics is presented, including coverage of force systems, moments, couples, centroids, area moments of inertia, friction, and use of free-body diagrams in the solution of equilibrium problems of trusses, frames, and machines. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGR 203 - Mechanics of Materials

    Prerequisite: EGR 108  and concurrent registration in MAT 203 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course studies the deformation of engineering materials in relation to stress and temperature. It includes axial, biaxial, torsional, shearing, combined and statically indeterminate loadings of beams, columns, shafts, tanks and connections, as well as deflection, and an introduction to plastic analysis. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGR 204 - Dynamics

    Prerequisite: EGR 108  and concurrent registration in MAT 204 
    (3 Credits)
    Coverage of principles of dynamics, kinematics, and kinetics of particles, kinetics of systems of particles, and kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies through Euler’s equations is included. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    EGR 206 - Thermodynamics

    Prerequisite: EGR 103 .
    Corequisite: MAT 204 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course covers heat, work, and related properties of substances as well as equations of state, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    EGR 208 - Systems and Circuits


    Corequisite: MAT 206 .
    (4 Credits)
    This course includes basic circuit theory including Kirchoff’s Laws, node and mesh analysis in the time and frequency domains and solution of circuit differential equations.  Also treated are linear, non-linear and time-varying elements of systems and circuits, zero input, zero state and complete response, coupled elements, ideal transformers, controlled sources and basic filters. Labratory fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EGR 210 - Digital Logic Design

    Prerequisite: EGR 103 , MAT 161 .
    (4 Credits)
    This course includes the design of logic gates, flip-flops, registers, counters and the analysis of digital logic networks. Also included are Karnaugh map simplification and switching algebra, synchronous sequential systems, Programmable Logic Arrays, multiplexors and encoder/decoders, binary arithmetic with adders and subtractors, decimal to octal, hexadecimal and binary conversion.  Laboratory fee required. 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    EGR 211 - Elements of Discrete Signal Analysis

    Prerequisite: EGR 103  and MAT 204 .
    (4 Credits)
    This course introduces basic tools for the analysis of continuous and discrete time signals, including linear transformations and linear systems, solutions to linear simultaneous systems via Gaussian elimination, Fourier Transforms (continuous and discrete), finite impulse response filters and the z transform. The course also includes design projects emphasizing MATLAB applications to signal and image processing.  Total of 60 contact hours.

  
  •  

    EGR 269 - Internship I


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.

  
  •  

    EGR 270 - Internship II


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.


English

  
  •  

    ENG 098 - Writing Basics

    Prerequisite: An appropriate score on placement test and/or writing sample.
    (3 Credits)
    This course presents an integrated approach to the development of writing and reading skills necessary for college success. Instructional activities are designed to emphasize the connection between writing and reading and to develop the skills and confidence that enhance success in subsequent courses. The primary focus is on achieving proficiency in core comprehension and writing skills. The core reading skills include increasing vocabulary knowledge and dictionary skills, identifying main ideas and implied meanings, identifying supporting details, and developing lifelong reading habits. The writing component focuses on both sentence-level concerns and whole discourse, but the emphasis is on sentence-level problems common to basic writers. Students placed into this course are required to utilize online learning tools a minimum of four hours a week and/or the Learning Support Center one hour per week for additional instruction, homework, and skill-building exercises. A minimum attendance of two Learning Support Center workshops outside of regular class time is required. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    ENG 099 - Writing Essentials

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 098  and/or an appropriate score on placement test and/or writing sample.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is designed to help students develop effective writing and reading strategies appropriate for college studies. Students will engage in a variety of reading and writing activities, concentrating on logical interpretation of what they read and on clear written expression of what they understand. Instruction focuses on developing reading strategies to enhance comprehension, recall, analysis of texts and college-level vocabulary. Writing instruction emphasizes paragraphs and short essays that are unified, coherent, and fully developed. Students placed into this course are required to utilize online learning tools a minimum of four hours a week and/or the Learning Support Center for additional instruction, homework, and skill-building exercises. A minimum attendance of two Learning Support Center workshops outside of regular class time is required.  Course fee required. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    ENG 100 - Beginning Composition

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 099  and/or an appropriate score on placement test and/or writing sample.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is a survey of fundamental writing and reading skills with an emphasis on sentence structure, organization, diction and paragraph development as components of the essay. Focus is placed on the application of these skills in effective study of college- level materials. By completing the course content objectives, students will develop their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills and will improve their ability to express ideas orally and in writing in ENG 101  and other college-level courses. Students placed into this course are required to utilize online learning tools a minimum of three hours a week and/or the Learning Support Center for additional instruction, homework, and skill-building exercises. A minimum attendance of two Learning Support Center workshops outside of regular class time is required.  Course fee required. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    ENG 101 - English Composition

    Prerequisite: ENG 100  or appropriate score on placement test.
    (3 Credits)
    This course examines paragraph and theme development with emphasis on syntax, organization, logical thinking, and diction as a basis for writing. Students are given extensive practice in creating and revising their own compositions. Documentation and plagiarism are discussed. Selected readings may be used. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 102 - Composition and Literature

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course refines the writing process through the reading and interpretation of literature. Students learn manuscript presentation, inquiry, and research skills by writing a clearly documented research paper. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 104 - Children’s Literature


    (3 Credits)
    This course increases students’ knowledge about children’s literature historically and specifically, provides opportunities for the reading and increased enjoyment of a wide variety of literature for many age levels, and provides opportunities for oral reading, telling, and writing in class. For each content category in children’s literature, students determine the attraction and value for children, age group suitability, use of materials, recommended authors and illustrators, and representative examples. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 112 - Technical Writing I

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course in the principles and mechanics of technical writing enables both undergraduates and those already employed in business and industry to present technical information in an approved manner. It provides for a general review of English composition as well. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 114 - Mythology

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    The emphasis of this course is upon Greek and Roman gods and those classical myths which have had the greatest impact upon Western arts and culture. The modern use of classical myths is also examined. Mythology from other areas of the world is included as time permits. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 201 - World Literature I

    Prerequisite:

     

     
    (3 Credits)


    This course acquaints students with early literary landmarks of Western and non-Western cultures, helping them to appreciate their value, and to express their critical judgment of them orally and in writing. It covers literary highlights of ancient times, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 202 - World Literature II

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course acquaints students with later literary landmarks of Western and non-Western cultures, helps them appreciate their value, and express their critical judgment of them orally and in writing. It covers masterpieces of neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, symbolism, post-colonialism, diasporic literature and the modern world. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 203 - British Literature I

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course is a chronological study and reading of representative prose and poetry from the beginning of the Anglo Saxon period to the Romantic period (1800). Some attention is given to the historical and social background of each period. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 204 - British Literature II

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course offers readings of representative prose and poetry from the era of Romanticism to the contemporary period with some attention to historical and social backgrounds. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 205 - American Literature I

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course presents significant American literary works and writers within their historical, cultural, and aesthetic frameworks from colonial times through the Romantic era. It increases students’ knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of American literature and it increases their skills in literary analysis, writing, and discussion. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 206 - American Literature II

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course presents significant American literary works and writers within their historical, cultural, and aesthetic frameworks from the era of Realism to the present. It increases students’ knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of American literature and increases their skills in literary analysis, writing, and discussion. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 208 - Shakespeare

    Prerequisite:   or permission of instructor.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is a detailed study of a selection of the great comedies, tragedies, and histories. Emphasis is placed on historical and contemporary Shakespearean criticism. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 209 - Creative Writing I

    Prerequisite: ENG 099 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course offers practice in the planning and writing of original material. Attention is focused upon problems that writers most frequently encounter. Appropriate selections from literature are read and discussed. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 210 - Creative Writing II

    Prerequisite: ENG 099 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course is a continuation of ENG 209 . Attention is again focused upon problems that writers most frequently encounter. Appropriate selections from literature are read and discussed. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 214 - Applied English Grammar

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course offers advanced study of English grammar with some attention to the historical aspects of English. Emphasis is on grammatical concepts, sentence structure, punctuation, and syntax. The course will also cover theories of grammar and language and their application to writing and teaching writing. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 216 - Ethnic Voices in American Literature

    Prerequisite:  .
    (3 Credits)
    This course acquaints students with writers from a variety of American cultures, including Native American, African American, Asian, and Hispanic literature. It helps students to understand, appreciate, and critically value these writers’ works. The course covers the historical, cultural, and aesthetic values of these works both orally and in writing. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 219 - Contemporary Literature

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    This course explores the most recent literature to win national or international awards. Students interpret this literature and analyze the process used to judge contemporary literature. Students compose literary analyses on new literature and research publication venues for their scholarly critical writing. Total of 45 contact hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 220 - Literature By and About Women

    Prerequisite: ENG 099 .
    (3 Credits)
    Students read and discuss a broad range of literature by women while considering how male and female authors portray the female character and the historical attitudes she embodies. Contemporary women writers’ interests and accomplishments provide a framework for discussion and examination. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 240 - Seminar in English Studies

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 .
    (1 Credit)
    This course provides English majors with a capstone experience that brings together their previous course work and prepares them for transfer to a four year institution. Students will demonstrate their knowledge and proficiency in literature, writing, and critical thinking by assembling a portfolio of writing and reflecting on their knowledge and skills. Topics covered will also include transfer expectations and career development. This course should be taken during the last semester of course work. Students will be expected to demonstrate that they have met the English program outcomes. Total of 15 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENG 269 - Internship I


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.


English as a Learned Language

  
  •  

    ELL 101 - English Composition for English Language Learners

    Prerequisite: ESL 100  or appropriate score on the placement test.
    (4 Credits)
    This course is designed for non-native speakers of English and will examine paragraph and theme development with emphasis on syntax, organization, logical thinking, and diction as a basis for expressing written and oral ideas. Students are given extensive practice in creating and revising their own compositions, appropriate use of documentation, and avoiding plagiarism. Selected readings may be used. Students placed into this course may be required to visit the Learning Support Center for additional instruction and language and/or skill-building exercises. This course is equivalent to ENG 101  and satisfies the English General Education requirement. Total of 60 contact hours.


English as a Second Language

  
  •  

    ESL 098 - ESL Writing Basics

    Prerequisite: An appropriate score on placement test.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is designed for students whose native language is not English. Instruction includes integration of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The primary focus is on achieving proficiency in core comprehension and writing skills. The reading skills include increasing vocabulary knowledge and dictionary skills, identifying main ideas and implied meaning, identifying supporting details, and developing lifelong reading habits. The writing component focuses on both sentence-level concerns and whole discourse, but the emphasis is on sentence-level problems common to basic writers. This course meets requirements for preparation for the college credit ESL track and is offered free of charge as it is aligned with the Adult Education Program’s grant funded ESL Advanced level class (although students are still required to purchase a text book).  Students will need to attend the Learning Support Center outside of class time for a minimum of two hours a week. This time may be spent in Conversation Group and/or online or Distance Learning Programs as assigned by the instructor. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    ESL 099 - ESL Writing Essentials

    Prerequisite: An appropriate score on placement test.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is designed for students whose native language is not English. Instruction includes integration of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The primary focus is on achieving proficiency in core comprehension and writing skills. The reading skills include increasing vocabulary knowledge and dictionary skills, identifying main ideas and implied meaning, identifying supporting details, and developing lifelong reading habits. The writing component focuses on sentence, paragraph, and other contextualized writing and whole discourse at increasing levels of difficulty and maturity. This course meets requirements for preparation for the college credit ESL track and is offered free of charge as it is aligned with the Adult Education Program’s grant funded ESL Advanced level class (although students are still required to purchase a text book).  Students will need to attend the Learning Support Center outside of class time for a minimum of two hours a week. This time may be spent in Conversation Group and/or online or Distance Learning Programs as assigned by the instructor. Total of 45 contact hours.

  
  •  

    ESL 100 - ESL Beginning Composition

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 099  and/or appropriate score on placement test and/or writing sample.
    (3 Credits)
    This course is designed for students whose native language is not English. This course is a survey of fundamental writing and reading skills with an emphasis on sentence structure, organization, diction, and paragraph development as components of the essay, as well as emphasis on particular comprehension skills essential for reading college texts. Emphasis is placed on the application of these skills in effective study of American college-level materials. By completing the course content objectives, students will develop their reading, writing, listening and thinking skills and will improve their ability to express ideas orally and in writing in ENG 101/ELL 101 and other college-level courses. Students placed into this course are required to utilize online learning tools for additional instruction, homework, and skill-building exercises, and are required to meet with instructors and/or to visit the Learning Support Center outside of normally scheduled class times. Course fee required. Total of 45 contact hours.


Entrepreneurship

  
  •  

    ENT 101 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship


    (3 Credits)
    This course provides a broad overview of entrepreneurship. It is intended for those who are interested in turning an idea into a successful venture, whether they are entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, innovators, or small business owners. Students will learn about entrepreneurial skills, attitudes, and methods that can be applied to a wide variety of situations and environments. Emphasis is on assessing and developing an entrepreneurial mindset, the application of the entrepreneurial method, and developing and recognizing opportunity. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 102 - Entrepreneurship: Creativity & Problem-Solving


    (3 Credits)
    This course examines tools and methods for solving a variety of problems in business and community environments. Students will explore elements of problem identification, design thinking, feasibility analysis, and business model development. Students will work on solving a problem in an area of interest. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 103 - Entrepreneurship: Developing an Effective Business Plan


    (3 Credits)
    This course examines the tools and methods needed to construct and implement an effective business plan. Students will consider what it takes to start and launch a successful business. They will develop a complete business plan during the semester, including an executive summary, company description, industry analysis, plans for target marketing, operations, technology, and management organization, as well as a complete set of financials. Students will also learn what it take to put the plan to work - presenting a business plan, seeking sources of funding, and drawing upon other support services available to entrepreneurs in the marketplace. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 104 - Entrepreneurship in Practice I


    (3 Credits)
    This course examines special topics related to entrepreneurship, with emphasis on local and emerging issues. Students will be introduced to local resources and entrepreneurs. Students will learn though case studies and other experiential activities. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 105 - Entrepreneurship in Practice II


    (3 Credits)
    The focus of this course is on starting and growing new businesses. Students will work toward launching a new venture or improving an existing business. Emphasis is placed on experiential, practical learning activities. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 106 - Entrepreneurial Marketing


    (3 Credits)
    This course clarifies key marketing concepts, methods, and strategic issues relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs. Students will explore both traditional and non-traditional approaches to marketing their ideas in order to best leverage limited marketing resources. Students will learn to apply basic marketing concepts in entrepreneurial settings, develop a marketing plan for an entrepreneurial idea, and address the issues unique to a new business as they develop the marketing plan. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENT 107 - Entrepreneurial Finance


    (3 Credits)
    This course is an introduction to financial topics for entrepreneurs. Topics include sources of financing, budgeting, financial statements, and measuring financial performance. Students will learn basic financial concepts and startegies that can be applied to both business and personal finances.  Total of 45 hours of lecture.


Environmental Studies

  
  •  

    ENV 201 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science I


    Corequisite: BIO 113  or CHM 101  or higher. 
    (4 Credits)
    ENV 201 is the first semester of an interdisciplinary course in Environmental Science. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts in environmental studies, with specific emphasis on the interdependent relationships between humans and the natural world. They will also examine how those interactions impact and influence the environment and ultimately the health and well-being of humans and all living species. Topics of study include ecology and ecosystem conservation, population growth and regulation, sustainable agricultural practices in food production and pest control. Anthropogenic environmental issues such as biodiversity decline, soil degradation and environmental toxicology, and related governmental policies will also be explored within the social construct of environmental issues.  Laboratory fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    ENV 202 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science II

    Prerequisite: ENV 201 .
    (4 Credits)
    ENV 202 is a continuation of ENV 201. It is required for all Environmental Studies majors pursing the Environmental Science area of concentration.  This course builds on the fundamental concepts learned in ENV 201, with specific focus on energy, earth systems and human resource utilization. Students will explore interactions between humans and earth’s abiotic resources, including topics such as natural resource mining, renewable and non-renewable resources, energy production, hydrologic resource use and associated global environmental impacts. Human-induced environmental issues such as loss of biodiversity, water and air pollution, global climate change, non-renewable resource consumption and toxic and solid waste production will be examined, as well as related governmental policies associated with  these issues. Solutions to environmental issues will be explored within a social framework that includes the social and cultural construct of environmental issues and different points of view.  Laboratory fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab.

  
  •  

    ENV 203 - Environmental Policy and Regulations

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 
    (3 Credits)
    Students will review the historical context of environmental legislation, including a review of the early conservation movement and the establishment of the first National Parks, the National Park Service and the US Forestry Service, as well as early legislative efforts enacted to protect and conserve U.S. Natural resources. Students will also examine significant environmental legislation such as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Superfund, and the Toxic Substance Control Act, etc., as well as more recent programs such as Pollution Prevention Act and Brownfields. Regulatory concepts will be underscored with the introduction of concepts of environmental economics, principles of environmental management and the social construct of environmental legislation. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    ENV 204 - Public Health and the Environment


    (3 Credits)
    This course examines public health issues and a scientific understanding of the causes of major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Topics include how the body reacts to environmental contaminants; the physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; their sources and sinks (soil, water, and air); susceptible populations and environmental justice. Students will examine emerging global environmental health problems, conduct risk analysis of specific environmental pollutants and explore the scientific basis for policy decisions. Total of 45 hours of lecture.


Experimental Learning

  
  •  

    EXP 101 - Portfolio Development

    Prerequisite: ENG 100  or placement into ENG 101 .
    (2 Credits)
    This course is for students who wish to obtain credit for training and work experience. A portfolio documenting this training and experience is developed to meet the competencies required in a related HCC course. The portfolio is evaluated by HCC faculty for award of credit.


Geography

  
  •  

    GEO 105 - World Regional Geography

    Prerequisite: ENG 100  or placement into  ENG 101 .
    (3 Credits)
    World regional geography is an examination of global regions, patterns, and trends which together form the basis for interpreting world affairs and regional interactions. Topics include the growth of the global political economy, nations and states, international organizations, boundary disputes, population pressures, resource distribution, and other ongoing processes of international cooperation and conflict. Total 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    GEO 269 - Internship I


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.

  
  •  

    GEO 270 - Internship II


    (3 Credits)
    See “Academic Policies ” section of current HCC Catalog for internship guidelines.


Graphic Design Technology

  
  •  

    GDT 112 - Computer Graphics


    (3 Credits)
    This entry level hands-on graphics course is for aspiring designers, graphic artists, illustrators, web designers, videographers, photographers, and anyone interested in creating well designed graphics involving digital media. Using state of the art computers plus the latest software, students will be introduced to digital foundations using Adobe Creative Suite. Illustrator (vector based), Photoshop (bitmap), InDesign (text formatting and layout), Dreamweaver (html), and Flash (animation) will be explored. Students will be introduced to the principles of graphic design, the design process, and the field of graphic design. This is an entry level course. Students should be comfortable using a mouse and keyboard. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    GDT 116 - Digital Imaging


    (3 Credits)
    This course is an intensive investigation into digital image creation and editing using industry standard software: Adobe Photoshop Creative Suite. Students will learn how to create and manipulate digital images from scratch, as well as use the scanner. Image editing will include a large variety of features in Adobe Creative Suite Photoshop as they relate to applications in the graphic design field. Emphasis will be placed on preparing digital files for web, offset print and inkjet output. Students will gain an overview of how digital files are used in the field of graphic design. Students produce a portfolio of their work. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    GDT 142 - Computer Illustration: Adobe Illustrator


    (3 Credits)
    Using the computer as a powerful drawing tool, this course explores the world of digital illustration using the vector based program, Adobe Illustrator. This software is ideal for the creation of graphics, illustrations, logotypes, and posters. Students will create a portfolio based on visual design problems. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    GDT 143 - Digital Layout/Prepress


    (3 Credits)
    Using Adobe Creative Suite InDesign and typesetting students will learn how to apply the principles of graphic design to page layout. Students will gain proficiency in page layout as well as learn how to set type. Prepress and printing issues will be covered. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

  
  •  

    GDT 146 - Graphic Design I

    Prerequisite: GDT 116  and GDT 142  or GDT 143  or consent of TCS Division.
    (3 Credits)
    In this class, students will learn how to implement the principles and elements of graphic design (contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity, as well as line, color, shape, depth, texture, and format). They will see how these are used to solve visual communication problems. The assignments will be created digitally using current software applications such as Adobe Creative Suite Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe InDesign. Students will receive an overview of the field, follow the design process, and see what it is like to be a graphic designer. Students produce a portfolio of their work. Course fee required. Total of 45 hours of lecture.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8